The Women Behind 'The Digital Sisterhood' are Fast Becoming Our Faves

The Women Behind ‘The Digital Sisterhood’ are Fast Becoming Our Faves

. “Our stories are universal,” says Cadar. “So we want to create an international community where we can have real talks and be inspired by one another”. She stressed that as Africans, black women inherited the art of storytelling from their ancestors, so the digital sisterhood is tapping into the incredible power of storytelling to change lives.

Djoumbé Fatima Soudi: The Black Muslim Queen of Moheli Who Resisted European Colonialism

Djoumbé Fatima Soudi: The Black Muslim Queen Who Resisted European Colonialism

According to the photographer, she had a number of attendants and was dressed extremely finely in a “robe of rich Turkish tissue of silk and gold”. Her dress covered most of her face, with only her hand visible. The purpose of the visit had been to impress upon the young queen the advantages of becoming a French colony. But she vehemently resisted.

Revisiting Lila Abu-Lughod's 'Do Muslim Women Need Saving': A Commentary on Taliban and Western Imperialism

Revisiting Lila Abu-Lughod’s ‘Do Muslim Women Need Saving?’: A Commentary on Taliban and Western Imperialism

The burqa existed long before the Taliban, worn by Pashtun women to mark “the symbolic separation of men’s and women’s domains.” Although it could be argued that this reinforces patriarchal ideas of women belonging at home, we must remember that many saw the burqa as a “liberating invention”.

Is Modesty the Cure for Sexual Harassment?: 5 Muslim Women Share their Stories

Is Modesty the Cure for Sexual Harassment?: 5 Muslim Women Share their Stories

Society tells women a million ways, how to avoid being harassed, how to dress modestly, how not to walk alone at night, how to be extra careful, how to be a nun practically and live in the forest or disappear. No one preaches hard to men to refrain or endeavour to look away as enjoined in the Qur’an.  It’s really not about dressing. It’s about power dynamics and zero consequences.”

Why Toxic Muslim Aunties Enable Abuse and Misogyny in Our Communities

Why Toxic Muslim Aunties Enable Abuse and Misogyny in Our Communities

I acknowledge that once upon a time, our “aunties” were once Muslim girls, who unfortunately were subjected to the same experiences bedevilling young Muslim women of today. Due to the sexist structures put in place to uphold their oppression, they were unable to adequately navigate and dismantle their predicaments.