TMWT in Conversation with Fitriya Mohamed - The Woman Pushing for Inclusivity in Sports

TMWT in Conversation with Fitriya Mohamed – The Woman Pushing for Inclusivity in Sports

Fitriya Mohamed: Absolutely, but I did not let my difference stop me from pursuing sports. More so, with
my teammates, the love and support I received from them encouraged me to continue playing. On the other hand, I was discouraged on multiple occasions by members of my community and family members, because to them, “sport is for boys, not girls”. I was told to focus on other things that would get me somewhere. They tried to use religion to exemplify their reasonings but that did not make sense to me because deep down, I knew what I was doing was not wrong.

This Feels Like Home: Muslim Women Talk About Genuine Friendships and Red Flags

This Feels Like Home: Muslim Women Talk About Genuine Female Friendships and Red Flags

We do brunch together to catch up on life and laugh till our bellies hurt, drop off a dish we cooked and get something else in return in that butter tub. I can give them constructive criticism and advice with good intentions. I’m there to catch them or pull them up whenever they are about to fall.

The Women Behind 'The Digital Sisterhood' are Fast Becoming Our Faves

The Women Behind ‘The Digital Sisterhood’ are Fast Becoming Our Faves

. “Our stories are universal,” says Cadar. “So we want to create an international community where we can have real talks and be inspired by one another”. She stressed that as Africans, black women inherited the art of storytelling from their ancestors, so the digital sisterhood is tapping into the incredible power of storytelling to change lives.

Djoumbé Fatima Soudi: The Black Muslim Queen of Moheli Who Resisted European Colonialism

Djoumbé Fatima Soudi: The Black Muslim Queen Who Resisted European Colonialism

According to the photographer, she had a number of attendants and was dressed extremely finely in a “robe of rich Turkish tissue of silk and gold”. Her dress covered most of her face, with only her hand visible. The purpose of the visit had been to impress upon the young queen the advantages of becoming a French colony. But she vehemently resisted.