Author: Assia Hamdi

Assia Hamdi is the Spotlight Editor for The Muslim Women Times. She is a graduate of History and Arabic at SOAS University of London. She is also a lover of travel, writing, spirituality and food.
Her-story and Her: An International Women's Day Poem by Assia Hamdi
The Feature

Her-story and Her: An International Women’s Day Poem

What a way to
Drown out the her-stories of History.

How they
Deemed her legacies unworthy,

Then they
Severed the lineages of our identity.

And they
Removed our communities agency.

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When the Revolutionary World was One; The Internationalism of the Black Panther Party and Algeria as the Capital of the Third World.
The Tone Up

When the Revolutionary World was One; The Internationalism of the Black Panther Party and Algeria as the Capital of the Third World.

For a while, the heroes of the decade were people whose mind and matter were not white, Fidel Castro in Cuba, Gamal Abdel Nasser in Egypt, Malcolm X in America, Ben Bella in Algeria, Ho Chi Minh in Vietnam, amongst many others. Suspend your politics of left and right or your views on violence and non-violence as a means for liberation for a second and consider that for a period, people tried to put the oppressed people first.

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On The Great Gatsby: The Second-Part Book and Theme Review of 'Reading Lolita in Tehran' byOn The Great Gatsby: The Second-Part Book and Theme Review of 'Reading Lolita in Tehran' by Azar Nafisi Azar Nafisi
The Bookshelf

On The Great Gatsby: A Thematic Review of ‘Reading Lolita in Tehran’ by Azar Nafisi

Daisy is a representation of the marginalisation of women and their existence as possession in the 1920s; her trophy wife status, beauty and lack of intelligence highlight a lineage of societal gender expectations on a woman. All of this as we are well aware of is an abstract image that still lives on today, built by males to manipulate and design the idea of the perfect woman. A mute, submissive and pretty woman.

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Appreciating and criticising Literature: Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi.
The Bookshelf

Appreciating and criticising Literature: Reading Lolita in Tehran by Azar Nafisi.

Nafisi fails to separate Islam from Muslims, the actions of the men seem to represent Islam in her writing. She under-handedly supports the Islamophobic views of Islam’s outdatedness, barbarity, and anti-feminism. Her Western education and nationalist Iranian loyalties, highlight her lack of knowledge on the rights of women in Islam, as well as her general ignorance of the globality of Islam.

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Al-Khansa: A Mistress of Ancient Arab Poetry
The Spotlight

Al-Khansa: A Mistress of Ancient Arab Poetry

Patriarchal studies along the years had relegated her work as emotional, typical of a woman, and even hysteric and obsessive. However, in a world, where Arabs believed themselves the fathers of poetry, her poetry would not have risen to popularity let alone survived had it just been emotional or beautiful.

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Timeless Lessons from Rabi’a Al-Adawiyya Al-Qaysiyya
The Spotlight

Resisting Patriarchy through Spirituality: Timeless Lessons from Rabi’a Al-Adawiyya Al-Qaysiyya

Modern analysis on Rabi’a often plagues her spiritual legacy by placing her in contemporary debates of feminism. Without falling within the paradigms set out by Western feminism and the notions that string along with it, Rabi’a focused on the inward unseen immaterial rewards in her life.

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Lubna of cordoba: One Woman, Many Tales - The Muslim Women Times
The Spotlight

From Slavery to Politics: Honouring the Multi-Dimensional Personality of Lubna of Cordoba

Contemporary historians failed to do justice to Lubna’s legacy. The why can be easily answered by the fact that she was a woman. A woman no less who earned her right to fame through skills and hard work. A woman who wasn’t the wife of someone influential, nor the daughter of a famous man.

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