Month: March 2021

can help Africa to build capacity, disseminate news from an African perspective, thereby building alignment and strengthening an authentic footprint
The Tone Up

Ever Considered Taking Off the Hijab?: Why Muslim Women Need to Have Honest Conversations

Over time, I found that the questions couldn’t be shushed anymore. Whenever I was around women, these questions would come to me. “Do you ever consider taking it off?” I would ponder. “Now that you are wearing it, how did you get to this stage? Who are you wearing it for?” These questions demanded answers. These are topics we should be able to discuss at great length, but these subjects, whenever brought up in conversations, are met with stark disapproval and resignation, as though they were blasphemy.

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Ramadhan, Period Shame and The Critical Male Gaze
The Issue

Ramadhan and Period Shame: Decentring the Critical Male Gaze

It is no secret that girls and women need special care during menstruation. Some girls and women can go through it without a lot of intervention but majority of girls and women do need some sort of special care. Add girls and women who have conditions like PCOS and Endometriosis into the mix and it becomes even more nonsensical that we have to hide it from the very people that we love.

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Ramadhan BookShelf: Here are 10 Empowering Books for Every Muslim Woman
The Bookshelf

Ramadhan Reading List: Here are 10 Empowering Books for Every Muslim Woman

As Ramadhan approaches, TMWT presents a list of carefully curated soul-lifting and empowering books to help every Muslim woman through the month. This list contains a translation of the Qur’an, the biography of the Prophet (PBUH), non-fiction books, fiction and memoir. These books will help you fall in love with your faith and reconnect with your Lord as you’ve never done before. You’re sure going to love them!

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Powerful Essays - In Her Words: African Women's Perspectives on Gender Equality
The Bookshelf

Powerful Essays – In Her Words: African Women’s Perspectives on Gender Equality

“In Her Words” is a big conversation starter. African women have come a long way but there is so much further to go. Books like this are vital for Africans, non-Africans and those seeking to understand feminism in Africa. It will also add to an already rigorous body of writing about this topic. While these essays promote a courageous and bird’s eye view of African women on the African continent, most of the writers agree that collective acceptance and solidarity is best achieved by promoting diversity even while fighting for the same cause.

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Muslim Feminism in Rokeya Shakhawat Hossain’s “Sultana’s Dream”
The Bookshelf

Muslim Feminism in Rokeya Shakhawat Hossain’s “Sultana’s Dream”

The utopia unfolds to reveal an entirely flipped gender duality, with women at the frontiers of productivity, science, and innovation, and men tucked away in the oppressive comfort of their homes with little agency. Destruction of the binary rather than this reversal can seem more mature on the surface, but what is mature is rational, closer to the cognitively acceptable. It is in the unapologetic and blatant reversal of the gender hierarchy, then, instead of a meek and sober dissipation into equality, that we are estranged from the real-time and space of the narrative in a classic science fiction motif.

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Zainab Cobbold: The First Scottish Muslim Woman
The Spotlight

Lady Zainab Cobbold: The First Scottish Muslim Woman

It seems that Zainab’s relationship with, and conversion to, Islam had an effect on the relationship with her family and more specifically, her marriage. She and her husband separated in 1922. Following his death in 1929; she began seriously pursuing the prospect of being able to perform Hajj. Zainab became the first Muslim woman born in Britain to perform Hajj; not only this but she also wrote a book of her accounts and this was published — Pilgrimage to Mecca. Zainab was aged 65 when she performed Hajj in 1933.

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The Soul of an Artist: In Conversation with Zainab Dahiru
The Feature

The Soul of an Artist: In Conversation with Zainab Dahiru

Art enables me to express my creativity and add beauty to the world through beautiful designs, and every time I look at my art, I reconnect with it in a beautiful way. My art is what it is at that moment and what it will be thereafter. There are challenges, and there will always be, especially if you are trying to monetize your work and trying to get yourself out there as an artist. But don’t get deterred by these challenges.

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Donning the Hijab: My Day as an Undercover Muslim Woman
The Tone Up

Donning the Hijab: My Day as an Undercover Muslim Woman

It made me think about how many Muslims go through degradation and ridicule in America? Especially post 9/11? I believe what struck me the most was my cousin. I love my cousin, he knows that but what he said first stung a little then confused me. He stated, “Go learn that lesson then take it off ASAP. And make sure they ain’t teaching you how to wrap explosives in that head wrap”.

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The Conversation with Maryyum Mehmood: Modern Muslim Women in Academia and Literature
The Conversation

The Conversation with Maryyum Mehmood: Modern Muslim Women in Academia and Literature

This week, Thursday, 18th March 2021, we are having our second real-time conversation around the topic “Modern Muslim Women in Academia and Literature”. Conversations will be shaped by Wardah Abbas, founding editor of The Muslim Women Times, Salimat Bakare, Assistant Architect at Crystal White Architects and Maryyum Mehmood, an academic, analyst, Producer of The Shift with Maryyum, Co-host of Diasporastan Podcast and Centre facilitator at The Edward Cadbury Centre for the Public Understanding of Religion, University of Birmingham.

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Living in Bad Faith: Why I Took Off My Hijab
The Tone Up

Living in Bad Faith: Why I Took Off My Hijab

I knew that people would look at me and think that I was liberated. I didn’t want to explain myself anymore, because that was all I ever did as a hijabi, and I wanted to escape the cycle where my body as a Muslim woman was perpetually a public affair. I was so tired of defending myself at the cost of myself, and it struck me as terribly cruel that the hijab would continue to define me by nature of its absence after I took it off.

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